happy birthday son

wnz-03Son,

A decade ago you entered my life. A decade ago you fundamentally changed me. I thank you for that.

A decade ago you turned one horrific date – September 11 – into a celebration. I thank you for that.

You make me realize every day that I am a father first and everything else is secondary. I thank you for that.

I try my best to be the best for you. Sometimes I’m sure I falter but you appear more forgiving than I am. I thank you for that.

You’ve allowed me to share all my passions with you – biking, computers, baseball, movies. I thank you for that.

I see the way your mind works, the way you create and invent and I stare in awe. Utter awe, even if it means I have to clean up a seemingly endless pile of Legos. And even then, I thank you.

I was so excited to see you that, on the morning you were born, I raced home from the hospital to shave! I wanted to look my very best for my boy.

In fact, I was so excited to see you that shortly after you were born at 5:11p I wrote this short story to add to your website:

wnz-06

Mommy started having contractions Wednesday night around 5pm. An hour later Daddy took us to the hospital and Mommy got comfortable for a long night ahead of her. Nurse Wendy said it was a full moon! Grandpa and Grandma Toosky stopped for a short visit.

On Thursday, after a lot of hard work (and several visits from my new family), I was born! Daddy helped cut my umbilical cord while Nurse Sue checked me over. Daddy says I was very well behaved and very alert – I didn’t cry at all until Nurse Sue gave me a quick bath. But I really liked when she washed my hair! Daddy said I had to get all fancy for Mommy.

At night, I slept, Mommy tried to sleep and Daddy kept watch over his new family.

In the last decade I’ve seen you crawl. I’ve seen you fall. I’ve seen you try. I’ve seen you cry, smile, laugh and bring joy to those around you. I’ve see you take your first steps (on the kitchen island!), your first train, your first plane, your first everything.

I’ve woken in the middle of the night to comfort you and not thought twice about it. And you’ve rewarded me by reading to me, by holding me, by telling me “Dad, you made me happy today.”

Son: You make me happy every single day. And for that I say thank you and wish you a happy 10th.

~ Dad

on starting @ lookout

Lookout

Those who don’t follow me on Facebook or LinkedIn probably don’t know this.

I have a new job.

That’s right. I’m joining the team at Lookout on Monday, September 9.

I can’t be more excited!

Getting ready

For the past two weeks I’ve been reading books and putting thought into my “First 100 Days” (and learned to blame FDR for this 100 day notion).

I’ve met with with my mentors (you all have mentors, right?), with my friends, and importantly, with my new co-workers. I’ve had breakfast with some, lunch with others and a baseball game with yet others. (My wife’s helped too!)

(I’ve also spent a little time learning chef & OpenStack.)

What I have right now is a very rough agenda. Not really a 100-day plan but an outline knowing that the first month or so will be immersed learning. Learning a new culture and a new dialect with its own set of acronyms and cadence.

But.

I. can. not. wait. to. start.

Why Lookout?

In “You’re in Charge–Now What?: The 8 Point Plan“, Neff & Citron suggest that as people begin to size me up and figure out who I am, I should find a way to share the reasons I took this job. So,

I started talking to Lookout nearly 5 weeks ago over a cup of coffee and throughout the interview process, I was struck by this common sense of passion. Struck by a sense of passion and excitement that started from that very first cup of coffee.

Struck that every interview felt like a conversation and not merely an interview.

Lookout, Fort KnoxStruck with the complexity of the technology and the essential question – how do you secure mobile devices? –  while knowing that the next billion users won’t be desktop users but mobile, knowing that users have content on mobile devices that define their life, content that would be better stored in Fort Knox than in someone else’s hands.

And somewhere in the middle I distinctly recall knowing that these are people I want to work with.

What am I going to be doing?

At my core, I’m an Operations guy. Always have been. I love building systems that scale. Systems that break but don’t wake me up because they broke.

I also love building and helping lead excellent teams. I love seeing people do amazing things.

I pour my heart and mind into figuring out how to scale infrastructure (and teams!) to help grow to hundreds of millions billions of users.

So I join Lookout as Director of Operations because these are the challenges that make me tick.